The Archives Project - Erwan Le Louër

Co-founder of le gramme and trained designer, the place of the object is central for Erwan Le Louër. He expresses all his passion for the object through his own collection of contemporary art and design named The Archives Project.
This collection translates the immoderate taste of the designer-entrepreneur for minimal aesthetic and strict lines, his quest for a creation where the tension becomes source of emotion.


How was the The Archives Project born ?
The Archives Project was created with passion, rigour and the will for transmission. I built this collection to enable me to create a link with my children on what animates me and what I have a passion for, but also to pass on a heritage that has a meaning in regard to what I am, to the place an object can have in my life, but also to transmit to them my passion for aesthetic and share with them the desire or not to enrich the collection, and make their own handover.
What underlies this project is indeed the minimal aesthetic and strict lines, whether it's photography, art objects or pieces of furniture. Progressively, my project continues to grow with new artworks and new objects that I choose with passion. The unique trigger for an acquisition is the emotion I feel.
I am on constant lookout, with a uncompromising rigour that has become a reflex, it inspires and nourishes me. To me, art and design are conceived to be observed and experienced daily – some of my objects are in the le gramme shop or the office -, this is the reason why I created The Archives Project catalogue that enables individuals or businesses to surround themselves with incomparable objects.

Your first acquisition ?
A photograph by Louise Lawler, acquired at the FIAC I liked at first sight. Louise Lawler is an artist who works in the vein of appropriationism. I liked this idea of mise en abîme that consists of making an new artwork out of someone else's artwork by taking a picture of it with its context (a museum, with collectors, during the mounting of an exhibition and its dismantling). Here it was a diptych by Richter. I was seduced by this minimal artwork in black and white, the angle of this view that created an abstraction and used photography to show painting.
« What underlies this project is indeed the minimal aesthetic and strict lines, whether it's photography, art objects or pieces of furniture. »
The artwork you hold onto the most ?
It's an architecture close-up, the detail of a light fixture of an industrial hangar taken by Ludovic Parisot, my best friend who passed away in 2016. Beyond our friendship, our mutual taste for a similar aesthetic that brought us closer, our immoderate taste for tense lines and radicality. The picture is in my home, and if I had to pick only one it would be that one.

The artwork that shook you the most ?
There isn't any because I reason with passion, I don't make an acquisition based on a purely rational decision, my relationship to art cannot be quantified. The artwork that shook me the most isn't actually part of my collection, it was the first time I didn't listen to my passion, that I started reasoning and asking myself certain questions, so I missed out on it, and I still regret it. However, the lesson that remains is that without it, I have the conviction that my acquisitions are made because of the emotion I feel.
The artwork that resembles you the most ?
A black and white photograph by Daido Moriyoma that represents the underside of an aeroplane. Because it expresses this form of radicality and rigour which I aspire to, by its structure and the choice of black & white that seduces me very often. I like photography because it captures instants and this is how life should be approached : capturing instants and making them memorable. This picture resembles me, we don't really know if it is about to take off or landing, but what counts is the object is in motion, that it is in a dynamic, just like my projects.

The beautiful intruder in your collection ?
The T-Chair by Katavolos ! For me the meaning of an object, the destiny of an aesthetic is to serve a function, to be able to be used, to enter everyday life. However, the structure, the height of the seats, not low enough nor high enough, makes them dysfunctional objects although they are beautiful.
« This is how life should be approached : capturing instants and making them memorable. »
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